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About

Former Visiting Research Scholars


David Orique OP Summer 2013

David Thomas Orique, O.P., conducted research at Oxford University building upon his previous domestic and international investigations related to two Dominican friars of the early Atlantic World—a period frequently called the Age of Discovery: Bartolomé de Las Casas (1484-1566) and Fernão (Fernando) de Oliveira (1507-1581).

David Orique is Assistant Professor of Latin American, Early Modern European, and Atlantic World History at Providence College. Recent publications include: “Journey to the Headwaters: Bartolomé de Las Casas in a Comparative Context” (2009); “New Discoveries about an Old Manuscript: The Date, Place of Origin, and Role of the Parecer de fray Bartolomé de las Casas in the Making of the New Laws of the Indies” (2010). He is completing a manuscript on Las Casas’s juridical approach, and is an editor for the Oxford Handbook of Latin American Christianity.


Robert Calderisi 2011-2012

Robert Calderisi, a former World Bank senior official, was hosted by the Institute during the academic year 2011-2012 while he prepared his book Earthly Mission: The Catholic Church and World Development will be published by Yale University Press on August 31, 2013.

Robert Calderisi studied history at Loyola College in Montreal, PPE at Oxford (on a Rhodes Scholarship for the Province of Quebec), African Studies at Sussex, and economic history at the LSE. He worked at the Department of Finance in Ottawa, the Canadian International Development Agency, the OECD, and the World Bank, where he was Division Chief for Indonesia, Papua New Guinea and the South Pacific, Chief of the Bank’s Regional Mission for Western Africa, and Country Director for Central Africa. His first book Faith in Development (2001) summarized a conference he organized in Nairobi with the Oxford Centre for Mission Studies. His second, The Trouble with Africa: Why Foreign Aid Isn’t Working, was chosen by The Economist magazine as one of the best books of 2006. His current research on the Church’s role in international development has been commissioned by Yale University Press and will be published in September 2013.